What to expect: Toronto Police RIDE program

Toronto’s finest kicked off their 2010 Holiday R.I.D.E. campaign on November 25 at Humber College. "The best gift this holiday season would be to have no vehicle collisions involving alcohol,” said Traffic Services Staff Sergeant Neil Bullock. Staff Sergeant Bullock was present, along with representatives from: the Toronto Police Service, Durham Regional Police Service, Halton Regional Police Service, Peel Regional Police, South Simcoe Police Service, and the Ontario Provincial Police. All participating police agencies conducted a R.I.D.E. spot−check on Humber College Boulevard, immediately following the kick−off ceremony.
 
On December 22, the police released some statistics to give an idea of how the program has been going: 2010 Holiday R.I.D.E. Spot Check Summary
 
Spot Check Summary
2009
2010
Vehicles Stopped
71,678
71,995
Drivers Tested
1,211
1,360
Charged Over 80
52
40
Charged Impaired
25
18
Issued a warn range suspension
117
148
Issued 90 Day Suspension
184
189
Vehicles Impounded
87
109
Total Persons charged
67
51
Total Drinking and Driving Charges laid
84
63
 
 “Drinking and driving charges are 100% avoidable. Every time someone chooses to drink and drive, innocent lives are put at risk. Toronto Police officers have seen 51 people make that choice so far this holiday season," said Constable Wendy Johnston.
 
Plan Ahead, Don’t Drink and Drive!
 
R.I.D.E. statistics: 2005 – 2009
page 31
 
 
Vehicles Stopped
Charges Laid
2005
275,660
310
2006
399,419
282
2007
426,485
344
2008
409,429
380
2009
408,274
490
 
Click HERE to read more from William Belle
 
References
 
Toronto Police Service: News Releases
 
Toronto Police: What To Expect When Stopped By Police
It is the policy of the Toronto Police Service that its members shall not discriminate, or attempt to persuade others to discriminate, against any person because of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, sexual orientation, record of offences, age, marital status, family status, handicap or political or religious affiliation.
 
This Web page is designed to provide information about the rights and responsibilities of both community members and the police. It will also provide some information as to why police make stops and what you can expect if you are stopped by police.
 
This document is not written to provide legal advice. If you have specific legal questions, you should refer to the appropriate legislation and/or seek counsel.
 
Police Officers may stop people who are driving when they observe an offence against the Criminal Code of Canada, provincial Highway Traffic Act, municipal by-laws or any other laws, or if the person or vehicle matches the description of someone in an investigation. Officers may stop people who are driving to ensure compliance with traffic laws and safety standards such as sobriety, possessing a valid driver’s licence and insurance, and the mechanical fitness of the vehicle.
 
Officers may stop pedestrians on the street if they observe an offence, if they are investigating a complaint, or if they believe the person has committed or is about to commit a crime. These interactions usually involve the officer asking for your name, address and identification, and other questions that are appropriate to their investigation.
 
Officers also routinely walk in their patrol areas and speak to people on the street. These contacts are not considered stops, and the goal is for the officers and the community to become more familiar with one another.
 
 
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