Fathers and Mothers in Canada

Fathers and mothers… by the numbers Here are some selected facts on fathers, mothers and parenting in Canada.

Parents in Canada

8.1 million — The total number of fathers in Canada (including biological, adoptive and step fathers) in 2006.

3.7 million — The number of fathers in Canada with children under 18 living with them (including biological, adoptive and step fathers) in 2006.

9.2 million — The total number of mothers in Canada (including biological, adoptive and step mothers) in 2006.

3.9 million — The number of mothers in Canada with children under 18 living with them (including biological, adoptive and mothers) in 2006.

Source: General Social Survey – Family, 2006 (Cycle 20).

Stay-at-home parents

In 2008, there were 2.7 million couples with at least one child under age 16 at home.

While the majority of these families were dual-earners, one in five (596,000) had one employed parent and one stay-at-home parent.

13% — The proportion of two-parent families with one parent at home (78,000 families) where it was the father who stayed home in Canada in 2008.

87% — The proportion of two-parent families with one parent at home (519,000 families) where it was the mother who stayed home in Canada in 2008.

Source: Unpublished data from the Labour Force Survey.

Parental leave

27% — The proportion of fathers who claimed paid parental leave for (or were planning to apply for) benefits for the birth or adoption of a child in 2007. This was up from 20% in 2006 and 15% in 2005.

376,800 — The number of mothers in Canada with a child up to 12 months of age in 2007, up 3.3% from 2006. More than three-quarters of these mothers (77%) had insurable income. In all, 86% of them had received benefits in the form of maternity or parental benefits during their pregnancy or since the birth or adoption of their child.

Source: “Employment Insurance Coverage Survey,” The Daily, Thursday, July 24, 2008.

See also: “Fathers’ use of paid parental leave,” Perspectives on Labour and Income, June 2008; Navigating Family Transitions: Evidence from the General Social Survey.

Adoptions

603,743 — The number of people in Canada who reported in 2006 that they had adopted children.

Time with the family

250 minutes — The amount of time men spent with their family members during a work day, on average, in 1986.

205 minutes — The amount of time men spent with their family members during a work day, on average, in 2005.

Keeping in touch

Dads who remain closely involved with their children in the first few months following separation have a much greater chance of remaining involved with their kids later on.

Source: “Study: Frequency of contact between separated fathers and their children,” The Daily, Monday, October 29, 2007.

Single parents

20% — The proportion of one-parent families headed by men in 2006.

80% — The proportion of one-parent families headed by women in 2006.

1.4 million — The total number of one-parent families in 2006.

Source: 2006 Census, Family Portrait: Continuity and Change in Canadian Families and Households in 2006: Findings.

New mothers

354,617 — The total number of births in Canada in 2006.

Younger mothers

116 — The total number of live births to mothers under 15 years of age in Canada in 2006. For 98% of these mothers, this was their first live birth.

14,432 — The total number of live births to mothers 15 to 19 years of age in Canada in 2006. For 86% of these mothers, this was their first live birth.

Raising Aboriginal children

In some homes in Canada, extended family and community play a role in raising the younger generation.

Adult children care for parents

Eventually there comes a time when it is an adult child’s turn to care for an aging parent.

2.7 million — The number of Canadians aged 45 and over in 2007 who provided some form of unpaid care to seniors (65+) with long-term health problems.

You can find more details at: http://www42.statcan.ca/smr08/smr08_130-eng.htm

For further information or to schedule interviews with a Statistics Canada Analyst regarding this release please contact: Jey Dharmaraj, at: (416) 954-5976 or jey.dharmaraj@statcan.ca

 

Related Articles

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


Confirm you are not a spammer! *