Rick Santorum He’s Eighteen of “Us”

Recently, Rick Santorum released his Form 1040 U.S. Individual Income Tax Returns for the years 2007 to 2010 inclusive.  I realize that this information has been covered by the mainstream media with a slant on how much tax Mr. Santorum paid, particularly in comparison to the size of Mr. Romney’s tax bill.  I’d like to put a slightly different slant on the data, comparing Mr. Santorum to average American families.
 
Let’s open by looking at a graph of data that I gleaned from the U.S. Census Bureau website showing the median household income for American families from 1990 to 2010:
 

That should help us put the financial data that we are about to see into context.
 
Here are screen captures showing the first two pages of the Santorum family Form 1040 for 2007:
 
 
 
Here are screen captures showing the first two pages of the Santorum family Form 1040 for 2008:
 
 

Here are screen captures showing the first two pages of the Santorum family Form 1040 for 2009:
 
 

Here are screen captures showing the first two pages of the Santorum family Form 1040 for 2010:
 
 

Now, here’s all of the pertinent data summarized on a chart:
 

Notice that over the four years from 2007 to 2010, the Santorum family gross income was $3,644,884.  Admirable, don’t you think?  In those same four years, the median household income for an American family was $199,758 or just under 5.5 percent of the Santorum family total gross income.  To put that another way, the Santorums made as much as 18.2 median American households.  
 
As well, over the four year period, the Santorum’s donated a total of $81,484 to charity, roughly 2.2 percent of their gross income.  Over the four year time frame, they paid a total of $1,003,495 in taxes for an average tax bill of 27.5 percent.
 
Here is another interesting bit of trivia from the 2008 return:
 

Just in case you wondered what the retail of an Audi A6 was in 2008, here’s the pertinent data:
 

I have absolutely no problem with someone making good money.  What I object to is candidates of all political stripes using the "working class background" mantra to attract voters.  Yes, Mr. Santorum’s  grandfather worked in a coal mine.  My grandfather was a farmer but that doesn’t mean that I have  any right to consider myself part of the farming community.  Unfortunately, his "two-generations removed" connection with blue collar America has absolutely nothing to do with whether or not he understands what it’s like to struggle to feed and family, pay a mortgage and other debts on a working-class, median American income.  I’d certainly say that a four year gross income of $3.6 million means that his reality is so far removed from ours.
 
Mr. Santorum, a few words of advice.  Now that we’ve actually seen your tax returns, stop pretending that you are one of us.  We’ll vote for you (or not) based on the quality of your character and your platform, not because of who you tell us that you are.  You don’t seem to mind being candid with America about your stand on birth control and homosexuality.  Now, be just as candid with Americans about your standing as a very high income earner.

Click HERE to read more of Glen Asher’s columns.

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