South Sudanese Urged To Adopt Entrepreneurship, Create Jobs

State Deputy Governor Jerome Gama Surur addressing residents in Torit. [Peter Lokale Nakimangole]

The Eastern Equatoria State Government officials have appealed to the young generation to make use of their gifted talents along with acquired skills and knowledge to create jobs for themselves and others.

In order for the new nation to emerge as a well-built and vibrant economy, its leadership must transform it youthful generations from being job seekers to job creators, the leaders recommended.

The Deputy Governor Jerome Gama Surur who spoke while addressing gathering in Torit said youth should not expect their government to always do everything for them or to give employment to them but youth must instead work hard to excel in businesses.

The leaders said youth must try to learn from their fellow foreign nationals who have come all the way from different neighbouring nations like Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Congo, Rwanda, Eritrea and Tanzania to do business.

They must make their productive programs so the government could respond to them.

The deputy governor clarifies that the government does not provide employment but only provides and ensures enabling environment to allow investors to put in investment.

He clarifies that it is always the private sector that supports the government to provide the growing population with employment opportunities.

“Youth, don’t expect government to give employment. Government does not provide employment but only provides and ensures enabling environments to allow investors to put in investment.”

The government believes that the continued economic development and progress of the state can only be achieved through sustained entrepreneurial growth as an entrepreneurship is always an idea to be converted into goods and services, so that people will always pay for them in return for services.

Entrepreneurs usually rejuvenate innovation, create jobs, grow economies and create wealth for all and it is the government to create institutions and the public structures that support entrepreneurial endeavours.

Following the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in 2005 and the Independence of South Sudan in 2011, the new nation has seen an influx of young people returning into the country mainly from neighbouring Sudan, East Africa and beyond.

Inter-communal conflicts and conflict in neighbouring countries continue to displace young people in and out of the country.

Globally, over 21 million young people migrate annually yet little is known about their struggles and experiences. Many young immigrants face equal or greater struggles, including discrimination, human rights violations and face the risk of sexual exploitation and abuse.

Some of the challenges that young immigrants and returnees in South Sudan continue to face include discrimination, loss of livelihood, lack of education, psychological trauma and separation from family and friends.

However many young South Sudanese are returning to contribute towards the development of their country.

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