Bob Dylan’s Film Noir Video The Night We Called It A Day

This article was last updated on May 27, 2022

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The Night We Called It A Day

Dylan’s new video from Shadows in the Night features movie director Nash Edgerton and Bob Dylan

By Stephen Pate – The Night We Called It A Day may be a love song but Bob Dylan visualizes it as a black and white film noir video with a violent ending. The song from the new CD Shadows In The Night which reached # 1 in some countries and #7 on the US Billboard 200 chart.

The video story line features a three-way romance with a femme fatale dancer, Dylan and Robert Davi as her suitors and a downer ending played tongue in cheek.

Dylan has been fascinated with films and film dialogue for decades. His songs have been littered with lines from movies. From the classic John Huston detective movie The Maltese Falcon there are several direct references.


“I don’t mind a reasonable amount of trouble…” (Seeing the Real You at Last)

“Don’t look for me/I’ll see you…” (When the Night Comes Falling from the Sky)

“Maybe you love me and I love you …” (When the Night Comes Falling from the Sky)

“You wanna talk to me/Go ahead and talk…” (Tight Connection to My Heart)

“Well, I’ll have some rotten nights after I’ve sent you over/But that’ll pass…” (Seeing the Real You at Last) (from The Thrilling Detective)

Jim Linwood compiled a list of direct quotes from movies in Dylan lyrics. Film Dialogue in the Lyrics of Bob Dylan

“Out of the 61 films listed, 19 belong to the dark, cynical cycle of 40/50s crime films that French cineastes later christened film noir and nine star the archetypal noir anti-hero, Humphrey Bogart” said Linwood.

“The film from which most of Dylan’s quotes are taken is John Huston’s The Maltese Falcon (1941), which defined the noir genre and Bogart’s screen persona. Like film noir, Dylan’s songs of the 80s, from which most of the quotes are taken, point to what Eddie Muller called the struggle of the individual to transcend or escape “the black core of corruption in our ‘civilized’ society and our primitive essence.””