Police Announce Plans To Strengthen Security In Juba

Minister of Interior Aleu Ayeny Aleu has vowed to tighten legislation in the police sector in an effort to better governance. [Gurtong | File]

Deputy Inspector General of Police Lt. Gen. Andrew Kuol in a statement to the UN Miraya radio on Monday said the authorities are concerned by the increasing number of cases of robbery and murder in the national capital.

Kuol added that criminals are also involved in targeting police personnel, but reiterated police efforts to crack them down.

“It has now become clear and imminent that the criminals are now targeting police,” Kuol said. On Sunday night a policeman was gunned by unknown group of armed suspected criminals in Juba.

The killing came following several others in this month that occurred in Juba.

“We must step up all means of fighting these criminals,” Kuol said.

Last week Hon. Wani Jadallah, the Deputy Minister of Interior told press, the Ministry has reviewed patrolling mechanisms by security and police personnel in Juba, an effort he said aimed at bettering the strategies further.

South Sudan Minister of Interior Aleu Ayeny Aleu has vowed to tighten legislation in the police sector in an effort to better governance as there is a gap at the Ministry, referring to absence of some laws which has made it challenging to punish even organized forces involved into some in-procedural acts.

Aleu has identified absence of Traffic Law, Fire Arms law and the Pension Law, saying these bills including others are yet to be established and channeled for legislation.

He said absence of these laws has created a challenge on how to improve police governance and cracking down a number of some of the criminal activities carried out in the country.

He also pronounced commitment in accelerating efforts in the already initiated reform in the police sector aimed at transforming the South Sudan police into a professional and transparent force.

On Tuesday, he unveiled that recent screening in the police force has uncovered 11,000 ghost names which could save the country US $9 million a month, adding that 16,000 more names are being investigated. 

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