Community Animal Health Workers Commissioned To Fight Against East Coast Fever

This article was last updated on April 16, 2022

The Animal Resources and Fisheries Ministry has now commissioned the graduates to all the payams in Torit County notably Kudo, Himodonge, Ifwoto, Imurok, Bur, Hiyala, Iyire and Loronyo.

According to the Ministry’s officials, the ongoing project has been financial, technically and logistically supported by Japanese Government through Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

Speaking at the graduation of the 20 CAHWs within his Ministry’s premises in Torit, the State Animal Resources and Fisheries Minister Patrick Lodinga Kotein sincerely appealed to the graduates to move to put into practice what they have gained in the just concluded training saying time has come for the people to defend their animals against a number of diseases like East Coast fever and nobody will come elsewhere to help if the state citizens are not really ready to.

The Ministry Acting Director General, Mr. Donato Apari, appealed to the graduates to take what they have learnt and implement as the Ministry will always be on alert to monitor the graduated health workers their respective Payams.

The State Animal Resources and Fisheries Ministry Acting Director of Veterinary Services and Diseases Control Mr. Quinto Asaye Alex urged the graduates to also support communities by taking seriously diseases’ control and management against their domesticated animals saying their animals are big economy.

He noted that there are prevailing animals’ diseases in communities.

The State Animal Resources and Fisheries Ministry Acting Deputy Director of Veterinary Services and Diseases Control, Dr. Guari Johntana described the training as a lively one ever witnessed in the history because trainees were ready to take what his Directorate wants to convey or give out to them.

He disclosed that the seven-Day training was successful because of the Japanese Government’s funds through Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO).

The East Coast Fever is one of the major disease constraints to cattle development and is well known to local farmers, stockmen and veterinarians.

Control of the disease is feasible but requires careful planning and any tick control measures must consider other local tick-borne diseases.

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