Research Reveals Reasons of Spiking Stillbirth Rate Among Aboriginals

According to the findings of a new research published by the Canadian Medical Association Journal, in Tuesday’s edition, there is a considerable difference of stillbirth rates in aboriginal populations in comparison to non-aboriginal ones in Quebec, particularly in the later stages of pregnancy. The study was subjected to highlight the reasons behind the extraordinary frequency of stillbirth rates in First Nations and Inuit populations.

The study presented a new evidence that linked the stillbirth  to health issues involved in obesity and smoking. It was also mentioned that a better access to obstetric care can assist in averting the discrepancy. The lead author of the study, works at the provincial public-health institute, i.e. Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, Dr. Nathalie Auger, explained that “stillbirth is a problem that’s kind of hidden, and there’s silence around it.” Dr. Auger alleged that “people don’t talk about it very much. Because of that there’s still relatively little research.” Previous studies have also claimed the rate among Canada’s First Nations and Inuit is newly two to three times more than in non-aboriginal populations and also one of the highest in the Western world.

The researchers evaluated the records of Quebec for almost two decades and discovered that health problems linked to smoking, such as poor fetal growth, placental disorders and birth defects, were the most contributing causes of stillbirth among the Inuit. Among First Nations, diabetic and hypertensive complications, which may be connected to obesity, was found to be a considerable contributing factors.

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